Reset with Prayer

The new year is a predictable time when we think about resetting certain rhythms in our lives, when we take stock of how we’ve invested our time, our money, our passions and where we want to be this time next year.

2020 has pushed on all of us – hard. It’s time we reset, and not just individually, but together as a church family. But we don’t need a new method or technique, we don’t need something novel to reset our spiritual lives. Rather, we need to lean into the ancient means God’s given us to grow and become the people He’s recreated us to be in Christ.

Today, we’re talking about doing that with prayer. And we’ll learn that while Jesus taught us a framework for prayer, He also taught us that the kind of people who pray fit a certain stereotype and know who God is and who we are in relationship to Him in a way that fuels their prayers.

Scripture: Luke 11:1-13; Galatians 4:4-7

Reset with God’s Word

God has designed humans and the world around us to experience new beginnings, new mornings, new seasons, and new years. In 2021 at Foothills, we are pushing the “reset” button to re-engage one another and our neighborhoods with the gospel. This means applying old truths to the new year.

Scripture: Psalm 119:129-136

The Gift of Hope

Because GOD is faithful, we have Hope!

Scripture: Psalm 16; Judges 17:6, 21:25; Genesis 25:29-34; Exodus 29:40-41; Leviticus 23:13; Numbers 15:5-7; Philippians 2:17; 2 Timothy 4:6; Psalms 1:1; Proverbs 1:5, 8:14; Acts 13:34-37; 2 Corinthians 6:2; Isaiah 49:8; Acts 2:25-36; 1 Corinthians 15:20-34; Romans 8:38-39

The Bigger, Better Story of Redemption

The story of Ruth in the Old Testament teaches a great truth that God has not forgotten His people. He provided a husband and son for Ruth, a redeemer for Naomi, and a King for His people. But the bigger, better story of redemption that Ruth teaches is that God has provided a Savior for the world.

The bigger, better story of redemption that Ruth opens as it closes, is that not only has God not forgotten us, but that God is with us, through the One True King – Jesus! And that bigger, better story of redemption has three implications for us: it upsets the values of the world; it removes our labels; and it gives us our ultimate rest in Jesus.

Scripture: Ruth 4:18-22; Matthew 1:1-25; Galatians 4:4-7

There is a Redeemer

Ruth 4 shows how God brings redemption out of ruin through the birth of a son. Boaz selflessly follows God’s Word to care for Naomi and Ruth and to perpetuate the name of Elimelech and Mahlon. Through this selfless act, God providentially provides His people with a redeemer, a king, and a Messiah. As God’s people today, we are called to trust in Him and the provision that He has made for His people through His Son, Jesus. In the Gospel we are called to selflessly follow God’s Word.

Scripture: Ruth 4:1-17

A Risky Plan Redeemed

God is at work in the complex details of our lives for His glory and our good. So we should act in faith, be righteous, and trust God to finish what He’s started.

Scripture: Ruth 3:1-18; Deuteronomy 25:5-10; Isaiah 42:3; Titus 3:4-6

Agents of God’s Lovingkindness

God’s lovingkindness is oftentimes granted to us through agents of His grace.

Scripture: Ruth 2

Dark Days, Bitter Heart

The book of Ruth takes place in the dark setting of the time of the judges. Everything that could go wrong seems to go wrong. What we would expect is that every person would do what is right in their eyes, but what happens is that even in the most difficult times imaginable, an unlikely person, Ruth, chooses to show loyalty to God and His people.

We are faced with difficulties, sometimes the unimaginable, and we are called to live like God’s covenant people. God has equipped us to do this through the Gospel.

Scripture: Ruth 1

A Prayer and a Promise for Unfinished People

Paul brings his first and deeply affirming, encouraging letter to the Thessalonians to a close. He prays that their sanctification, God’s will for them, will be finished and through at the coming of the Lord Jesus Christ. And he promises them that their faithful, heavenly Father, the God of peace, will surely do it!

In the midst of all the rigor of this call to walk in a way that pleases God more and more, in the face of opposition that seems unrelenting, he urges them on through his prayer and his promise.

As followers of Jesus in a world broken by sin and pressing hard against our faith in Christ, and in this life with its temptations pulling on our flesh, we often feel the discouragement and a kind of futility in living this life to which we’ve been called. We feel very unfinished, with the finish line nowhere in sight. But through his prayer and promise, Paul urges them and us, not to lose heart today because on that day He (our faithful Father) will make what’s unfinished glorious!

Scripture: 1 Thessalonians 5:23-28; Romans 8:29; Hebrews 2:11

How to be the Family of God

What does it look like to be a family of believers headed to forever together? That’s the question Paul is answering in this text. He’s calling the believers in Thessalonica to walk in a way that pleases God more and more. He’s told them that it’s God’s will for them to be sanctified. And as he finishes his letter, he gives them 17 commands that we’ve grouped under three headings – think of them as three core values for the family of God:

Humbly submit to those who lead us (12-13)

Do good to those around us (14-15)

Trust and Obey the God who saves us (16-22)

Scripture: 1 Thessalonians 5:12-22; Ephesians 2:20, 3:4, 4:11; Matthew 7:15-16; 1 John 4:1